Orgasm

Female orgasm.

female orgasm pleasure libido | Dr. Jason Winters | Sex Therapy | Blogging on Squarespace

For anyone interested in female orgasms, this is the most scientifically accurate and comprehensive piece that I've encountered in the main-stream media. It's very good.

The topics that it addresses, include:

  • vaginal versus clitoral orgasms
  • the low-down on the g-spot
  • regions of the brain that are responsible for orgasm
  • multiple orgasms
  • orgasm and penis/sex toy size

From the BBC:

The Mystery of the Female Orgasm
From the existence of the G-spot to the origin of multiple orgasms, female sexuality once mystified scientists. But as Linda Geddes discovers, radical experiments are finally revealing some answers.
by Linda Geddes
On my washing machine, there is a lock. To activate it, you must hold down the start button for a particular length of time at just the right intensity; too soft and nothing happens, too hard and the machine beeps angrily at you. Once you’ve mastered the technique, it’s easy; the lights switch on, things start moving and the cycle ultimately climaxes in a shuddering whirling crescendo of noise. Finally, an entangled heap of damp but refreshed clothes tumbles out at the other end. But for the uninitiated, it’s a perplexing mystery.
Consider now the female orgasm. JD Salinger once wrote that “a woman’s body is like a violin; it takes a terrific musician to play it right”. Pressed or caressed the right way, a woman can be transported to such ecstasy, that for a few seconds, the rest of the world ceases to exist.  But get it wrong and pain, frustration, or dull nothingness can ensue. It’s a stark contrast to a man’s experience; so long as they can get an erection, a few minutes of vigorous stimulation generally results in ejaculation.
Why are orgasms so intensely pleasurable? How come women can experience multiple orgasms? And does the fabled G-spot even exist? These are some of the most enduring mysteries of medicine. “We are able to go to the moon, but we do not understand enough about our own bodies,” says Emmanuele Jannini at the University of Rome Tor Vergata – one of those who has spent his career trying to unravel it. Recent years have seen a flurry of studies by these real-life Masters of Sex, and they are finally getting some answers.

Read the rest here: link.

How long does the average guy last in bed?

premature ejaculation orgasm time too fast | Dr. Jason Winters | Sex Therapy | Blogging on Squarespace

Many, many men worry that they aren't able to last long enough when having sex. Their concern is two-fold:

First, and foremost, men are often afraid that they aren't sufficiently satisfying their partners. The assumption is that lasting longer is always better. The fear is that partners will leave or be critical.

Second, sexual skills are central to many men's sense of masculinity. If a guy sees himself as bad in bed, he may feel like less of a man. And because stamina is considered to be important, the inability to go and go and go can be experienced as a failure at being a man.

Now, if a guy is struggling with premature ejaculation (which has been clinically defined several different ways, the most common being ejaculation in less than a minute), that's a much different experience than a guy who is worried because he typically lasts around 5 minutes.

So, how long do guys last, on average? Turns out to be somewhere in the neighbourhood of 5-6 minutes.

Dr. Justin Lehmiller reviewed the research for his piece in Playboy:

This is How Long the Average Guy Lasts in Bed
By Justin Lehmiller
When it comes to sex, some guys worry that they don’t last long enough–and I’m not even talking about guys with premature ejaculation here. Guys who already have a lot of sexual stamina to begin with often worry that they aren’t measuring up.
It’s easy to see how men might come to this conclusion. After all, the most popular men’s magazines are constantly publishing articles with tips on how to last longer in bed, and many advertise “sexual enhancement” products designed to improve sex by delaying the male orgasm.
Then there’s porn, which gives the impression that guys should be able to keep going and going and going—and then coming and coming and coming. But that’s a topic for another article.
So what’s typical when it comes to sexual stamina, anyway? How long does it take for the average guy to ejaculate?
Let’s take a look at the research.

Read the rest here: link.

Oh Joy Sex Toy by Erika Moen.

Erika Moen is an artist and educator. She is the authour the comic strip Oh Joy Sex Toy. It started out several years ago as a sex-positive, diversity-friendly sex toy review but has expanded into all aspects of sex and sexuality. There is no topic that she's afraid of addressing. The strips are fun, subversive, educational, and visually appealing. You can read more about her here and here. Check out all her comic strips and reviews here. And a sample of her work:

how to eat pussy erika moen cunnilingus oral sex  | Dr. Jason Winters | Sex Therapy | Blogging on Squarespace

Why do some people lose their hearing when they orgasm?

Link posted in the comments section this week (thanks!).

Some people, after they orgasm, get a ringing in their ears or temporarily lose their hearing. (I've also heard of people who experience a body-wide tingling that they describe as a more pleasurable version of the sensation associated with having your leg fall asleep.)

In a recent piece published at Broadly, a medical expert weighed in on why orgasms may affect hearing, in particular. Keep in mind that there is no research addressing this, so it's all theory at this point.

From Broadly:

Science Explains Why You Sometimes Can't Hear After You Orgasm
by Sophie Saint Thomas
When I come really hard, I lose my hearing for a few minutes—and I'm not the only one. I asked an ear, nose, and throat surgeon why.
[...]
Broadly: Have you ever heard of ringing in the ears related to orgasm? 
Dr. Eric Levi: I've never been asked that before, and I've never ever thought about the association between the two. So I did what I was trained to do with any question I don't know the answer to: I researched it to see if there are any available explanations in the scientific literature.
I think I may have found the possible explanations. But first, a big disclaimer: I am not an expert in the subject of tinnitus [the scientific term for ringing in the ears] or female orgasm. The findings detailed here are not an extensive and definitive thesis on hearing loss, tinnitus, and the female orgasm. It's simply how I theoretically and scientifically make sense of it with the limited data available on the matter.
[...]
Let's hear your hypotheses. 
Here is my first hypothesis: that the sudden reduction in heart rate and blood pressure results in sudden pressure changes in the middle ear and reduction of blood flow to the inner ear. The middle ear is a finely tuned piece of engineering. Changes in pressure within it would change the acoustic properties of sound transmission through the eardrum and hearing bones. This might result in a muffled hearing. In addition, the reduction of blood flow to the inner ear cochlea might mean that the hearing nerves might experience a transient reduction of essential nutrients, which results in temporary faulty signaling to the brain. This might explain the hearing loss and tinnitus.
My second hypothesis relates to what happens in the brain itself. During sex and orgasm, the areas in the brain that gets switched on are the nucleus accumbens (reward center), hypothalamus (oxytocin production), amygdala (emotions), hippocampus (memory storage), and cerebellum (muscle tone). More importantly, the parts of the brain that gets deactivated are the prefrontal cortex (decision making and executive thought) and the temporal lobe (hearing and sensory association center)—that last bit is important. My second hypothesis therefore is that the change in the activity of the temporal lobe after orgasm results in a change in auditory perception. This may result in some people having a change in their threshold for experiencing tinnitus. In addition, the release of chemical endorphins may also change the activities of the neurotransmitters in the brain, causing a change in sensory perception.

Read the rest for the full the explanation: link.

Bad sex media bingo.

Brought to you by Sense About Sex (link), a brilliant and fun way to counter all the misinformation that seems to get repeated over and over again in the media, despite no scientific evidence to support it. Read below the card for information from the Bad Sex Media Bingo site (link).

Notice any claims that you thought were true? For the explanations, click here.

From the site:

Why Bad Sex Media Bingo?

So much coverage of sex in the media is boiled down to the simplest of clichés and the loudest of headlines. People with vested interests – campaigners, people selling toys, remedies and dubious fixes – are uncritically quoted as experts.

There are many ways to spot a bad sex programme or article – one that’s been made to fit an agenda, perhaps, or one that is more about prurience and sensationalism than accuracy or helping people.

So we’re inviting you to play Bad Sex Bingo with us. How many of our bingo numbers can you spot during each new programme or article about sex? Will you be able to call House! first?

Play along with us on Twitter: our hashtag is #badsexbingo.

We also hope you’ll use Bad Sex Media Bingo to inform media production, to teach and train on these issues, to support activist work in this area, and for any other purposes for which it is useful.

Each of the points in Bad Sex Media Bingo is:

  • Commonly repeated in the media (across broadcast and print media),
  • Problematic and potentially harmful,
  • Easily recognisable, and
  • Covers a range of areas.

For each of our bad sex media examples we also have explanations saying:

  • Why they are a problem,
  • What negative impacts they can have, and
  • What would better ways of presenting sex there are.

Female orgasm rates vary by sexual orientation.

From the Indiana University:

Study: Orgasm Rates For Single Women Less Predictable Than Men's, Vary By Sexual Orientation

A new study of American singles found that during sex with a familiar partner, men have the highest orgasm rates. On average, men experience orgasm 85.1 percent of the time, with their sexual orientation making little difference. For women, however, orgasm occurrence is less predictable. On average, women experience orgasm 62.9 percent of the time during sex with a familiar partner -- and this pattern varies with women’s sexual orientation, with lesbian women experiencing orgasm more often than heterosexual or bisexual women.

[…]

The new study analyzed data from the 2011 wave of the Singles in America study, a now annual survey on the attitudes and behaviors of U.S. singles using nationally representative samples of single men and women ages 21 and older. The Singles in America sample was augmented to provide a better representation of gay men and lesbian women participants. In the current study, respondents were limited to men and women who had sex with a familiar partner during the previous year. It ultimately involved a final sample of 2,850 individuals.

Findings:

  • Women reported experiencing orgasm 62.9 percent of the time.
  • Lesbian women reported an orgasm rate of 74.7 percent.
  • Heterosexual women reported an orgasm rate of 61.6 percent.
  • Bisexual women reported an orgasm rate of 58 percent.
  • Men reported experiencing orgasm 85.1 percent of the time, with sexual orientation making no statistically significant difference (gay men 84.7 percent; heterosexual men 85.5 percent; bisexual men 77.6 percent).

[…]

The researchers speculate on the patterns observed, suggesting it could be the result of such known factors as length of a sexual encounter (earlier research points to lesbian women spending more time per sexual session); differences in gendered and sexual attitudes across sexual orientation; and even possible biological factors, such as prenatal exposure to the hormones testosterone and estrogen.

The study authors note that the National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior, also led by IU researchers, found a correlation between the rate of orgasms for men and women and the variety of sexual behaviors they reported.

Garcia said that partner communication -- both spoken and unspoken -- can play a big role in shaping sexual experiences and outcomes, including satisfaction.

"Some individuals will say what they want in a sexual encounter, or may be willing to say as much if their partner asked," Garcia said. "For others, communication may be nonverbal, with body language being key. This may also involve getting to know each other, both in and out of the bedroom, to understand what allows a particular sexual partner to experience a positive sexual outcome."

Importantly, however, Garcia also notes that orgasm should not be equated with sexual satisfaction, as the two can be quite independent, and that in some instances orgasm is not the goal of a sexual encounter.

Read the rest here.

Best fake orgasm scene ever?

From When Harry Met Sally (1989). For those who haven't seen it, the story follows two friends, Harry (Billy Crystal) and Sally (Meg Ryan), over several years and various relationships. Harry claims that men and women can never be friends, while Meg argues that they can. To find out who is right, you'll have to see the movie. At one point Harry and Sally argue about fake orgasms, which leads to this:

Any more nominees for the best or worst fake orgasm scene ever (excluding porn - that'd be too easy)?

More in the Comments section.

Ten things you didn't know about orgasms.

Mary Roach wrote the book Bonk, which is a peek into the weird and wonderful world of sex research. It's received all sorts of accolades and made many top ten book lists. From the book's homepage:

The study of sexual physiology—what happens, and why, and how to make it happen better—has been going on for centuries, behind the closed doors of laboratories, brothels, Alfred Kinsey's attic, and, more recently, MRI centers, pig farms, and sex-toy R&D labs. I spent two years wheedling and conniving my way behind those doors to bring you the answers to the questions Dr. Ruth never asked. Is your penis three inches longer than you think? Is vaginal orgasm a myth? Can a dead man get an erection? Why doesn't Viagra help women—or, for that matter, pandas?

More here.

Premature ejaculation and women's sexual satisfaction.

From PsyPost:

Study: Women repeatedly short-changed when it comes to premature ejaculation

Premature ejaculation is one of the most common sexual disorders in men. But it is not just the men who suffer; it also causes increased psychological strain and stress in women, as a new survey conducted by Andrea Burri, a clinical psychologist at the University of Zurich, reveals.

Around 40 percent of over 1,500 women polled from Mexico, Italy and South Korea indicated that ejaculation control is very important for satisfactory intercourse. It is not the short duration of the act of lovemaking that is primarily regarded as the main source of sexual frustration by the majority of women, but the fact that the man is focused too strongly on delaying ejaculation. As a result, he ignores the sexual needs of the woman and is unable to satisfy her individual desires.

Women who rarely climax suffer more

For the majority of the women polled, satisfying sexuality does not only consist of sexual intercourse, but also includes kissing, caressing and other forms of sexual stimulation, which are considered equally important. If the man is primarily preoccupied with his problem, premature ejaculation and thus his performance, these needs are ignored.

Sexual intercourse is increasingly determined by time and not “how we like it and what is good for us”. “In the long run, the woman becomes distressed and frustrated. Much like the man, she avoids sexual contact for fear of rejection and the resulting trauma for her own sexuality,” explains sex researcher Andrea Burri. The woman thus suffers a loss in quality of life and ultimately calls the relationship into question.

It is mainly women who do not perceive intercourse as the central aspect of sexuality, but prioritize sexual creativity that suffer from the man’s one-sided attention. “Interestingly, lengthy coitus is primarily important for women who do not have any trouble climaxing,” says Burri. For women who rarely reach orgasm – if at all – how long coitus lasts is not central. Instead, the sexual act serves to establish and experience intimacy and commitment. Although premature ejaculation is also regarded as exasperating by women, the short duration is deemed less problematic than the partner’s inattentiveness towards their other sexual needs.

Read the rest here.

G-Spot a myth?

From Salon:

The Truth About The “G-spot”: Why It’s Time To Put This Sex Myth To Bed New research suggests that our ideas about orgasms are missing the mark By Anna Pulley

Take a collective sigh of relief, humanity. If you’ve been one of the countless people searching in vain for the elusive Gräfenburg spot (aka the G-spot) or wondering why you aren’t gushing like Old Faithful each time someone makes a “come hither” motion in your vagina, then search and wonder no more. Once lauded as a “magic button” and the ultimate female pleasure enhancer, an Italian scientist’s recent report claims once and for all that the controversial G-spot is nothing but a myth (with a really good PR campaign). The study — published in the journal Nature Reviews Urology by Emmanuele Jannini, Professor of Endocrinology and Medical Sexology at Tor Vergata University of Rome, Italy — found that, essentially, the G-spot is just a sensitive area that’s part of the larger pleasure center that includes the vagina, clitoris, and urethra, or as the study sexily put it, the “clitourethrovaginal (CUV) complex.”

[…]

The “intimate area” that allows women to experience a heightened sexual pleasure includes the complete reproductive system, the study notes — including tissues, muscles, glands, and even the uterus. “Compared to the male erogenous zones, it is much more variable and complex, and also varies from woman to woman depending on the hormonal cycle,” Jannini told The Local, Italy’s English-written news site.

Jannini’s study is by no means the first to claim the G-spot’s pleasure capabilities have been overblown. In 2012, a study by urology resident Dr. Amichai Kilchevsky published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found no conclusive evidence of the G-spot’s existence. Kilchevsky looked at 96 published studies from the past 60 years, concluding that science couldn’t definitively find the G. “Without a doubt, a discrete anatomic entity called the G-spot does not exist,” Kilchevsky said. But he also notes that women who experience heightened pleasure around the G-spot area aren’t crazy or making it up. Indeed, biopsies of vaginal wall tissue have shown that in some women, there are more nerve endings in the purported G-spot than in surrounding areas, but even those studies are inconclusive. “What they’re likely experiencing is a continuation of the clitoris,” he said, adding that nerve endings alone do not an orgasm make (otherwise far more people would be studying the virtues of the perineum, aka the loner at your body’s prom).

Read the rest here.

(Art) Project: Beautiful Agony.

From Vice:

Coming on Camera: Beautiful Agony's Orgasmic Porn By Rula Al-Nasrawi

[…]

That project is Beautiful Agony—also called “Facettes de La Petite Mort.” It’s an Australia-based erotic website that posts daily videos of people masturbating until they orgasm. The twist is that the videos are only filmed from the shoulders up, so all you see is a succession of O-faces. The videos are basically webcam versions of Andy Warhol’s experimental “Blow Job” short film. Anyone from a DDD-cup porn star to your 95-year-old granddad can submit a video of themselves getting their rocks off. The videos range from one-man shows to group circle jerks, but you never see what’s going on down below. The name “Beautiful Agony” speaks to the almost painful tension you feel right before you come, followed by a zen-like state. The beauty lies in watching people of all walks of life momentarily lose control in the best way.

[…]

Founded by Richard Lawrence and Lauren Olney in 2004, Beautiful Agony hasn’t changed a lot since its inception. The site still has an old Windows 90-something look to it. The only difference between now and its debut is the long list of monthly subscriptions Lawrence and Olney have collected over the years. Pay $15 and you have access to hundreds of videos of people finishing themselves off, and confessing their innermost sexual secrets, for a month. Pay $100 and you’ve got access for the entire year.

Lawrence told me over Skype that the site was essentially born out of the duo’s frustration with mainstream porn.

“If we were to sort of parallel the porn industry with the car industry and imagine what a car looked like if it had the same values and the same sort of commitment to excellence that porn has, I think that you’d be looking at a piece of junk that costs $3 million that would run out of petrol after three miles.”

So Lawrence and Olney took matters into their own hands.

“We said, ‘Why don’t we try this and see what happens?’” Lawrence said. “I think we were a little too embarrassed to film our own [videos] and show each other, so instead we just lent a video camera around to some friends of ours that we knew were open-minded.”

[…]

Along with erotic projects like Hysterical Literature (photographer Clayton Cubitt's video series of women reading literature at a desk, while being pleasured underneath the table) and MakeLoveNotPorn.TV (a site where regular people submit their own sex videos for online rental), Beautiful Agony is pioneering a shift in the porn industry away from the male gaze.

“[Beautiful Agony] is something that fits right in with what has been kind of evolving over the last 10 years with the feminist porn movement internationally,” said Mireille Miller-Young, a professor of feminist studies at UC Santa Barbara. “It’s implicit critique is that the graphic display of pornography doesn’t necessarily equal pleasure for the viewer or the performer, and that you could possibly have something that’s less graphic or a more confined view."

Read the rest of the article here.

Homepage here.

And their videos on Vimeo here.

Video collage:


Ninja kegels.

Keep in mind that these exercises will increase PC muscle strength, and therefore may allow men to have dry orgasms (i.e., ejaculatory control). On the other hand, strengthened PC muscles may actually increase premature ejaculation (PE) in men already prone to PE.


Orgasms in animals.

From Popular Science:

FYI: Do Animals Have Orgasms?

Well, probably, but how can you tell?

Ah, the age-old question. When animals are going at it like, uh, animals, how does it end? Is there an animal version of the Big O?

It's a bit hard to say, actually. "The short answer is that we don't know much about orgasms in other species -- in fact, scientists are still studying the significance/evolution of female orgasms in humans," Marlene Zuk, a professor of ecology, evolution and behavior at the University of Minnesota, wrote me in an email.

Unlike humans, animals can't tell us they're having orgasms, so we can't truly know what their experience is like. For the most part, we assume that male animals orgasm because there's an ejaculation--though one can happen without the other, they usually go hand-in-hand. (Or something in hand.) The question of female orgasm is, as usual, more hotly contested, though all female mammals have clitorises.

Scientists can infer that animals--mostly primates--orgasm through recording physiological or behavioral aspects, like muscle contractions or changes in vocalization. Studies of primate orgasm have often focused on macaques, a subset of monkeys which are used often in research because they're genetically similar to humans and have similar reproductive systems. According to Alfonso Troisi, a clinical psychiatrist in Rome who has studied female orgasm in Japanese macaques, they're easier to study in the lab than gorillas or chimps. Macaques species tend to have longer copulations than other primate species like gorillas, which is a bonus if you're trying to observe their mating behavior.

"In the lab, by artificial stimulation, it is possible to trigger female orgasm in virtually any primate species."In a 1998 study, he and his co-author wrote that "Under specific circumstances, nonhuman primate females may experience orgasm." But, the rate at which the females orgasmed was variable, and they weren't exactly sure what caused them. Their study found that the level of dominance of the male macaque might play a role, for instance. But, as Troisi wrote me via email, "In the lab, by artificial stimulation, it is possible to trigger female orgasm in virtually any primate species."

Read the rest here.

Hysterical Literature.

From Criminal Wisdom:

In his latest project, Hysterical Literature, photographer Clayton Cubitt takes a beautiful woman, places her at a table in front of a black backdrop and gets her to read from her favorite book while an unseen accomplice below the table attempts to bring the woman to orgasm with a vibrator. The results are an intimate, sexy experience that captures a beauty rarely found in most modern pornography.

And one of the videos (NSFW noises!):

See the rest here.

 

Coregasms.

From Salon.com:

Working the coregasm

New science sheds light on the unexpected pleasure that some women feel during exercise

“At the end of yoga,” my friend whispers, inching closer, “something sort of … strange happens.” A quick glance around confirms that the good patrons of Starbucks are less interested in her confession than they are in the nearby screaming banshee baby.

“I usually sit with my feet together and my knees splayed,” she continues tentatively, “for one final stretch before I take shavasana.” I nod her on. So far, I follow. “Leaning over to bring my head down to my feet, as my breath regulates I feel a sort of … tingling and pulsating down (ahem) there. And … the feeling isn’t entirely unwelcome.” She exhales, as if a great weight has lifted. “But I mean, that’s pretty weird, right?”

Turns out it’s actually not. Exercise-induced female sexual pleasure has been the subject of casual discussion and un-researched speculation for years. Even sexologist Alfred Kinsey mentions the phenomenon in his “Sexual Behaviors in the Human Female” (1953). But until now, the experience was mostly anecdotal. Now, a study by Indiana University researchers offers scientific evidence that confirms confessions once incredulously traded in gym class locker rooms.

According to Dr. Debby Herbenick, co-director of the Center for Sexual Health Promotion at IU and sexual health educator at the Kinsey Institute, the oft-deemed “coregasm” (because of its association with crunches) can actually be linked to various exercises, including abdominal workouts, biking, weight-lifting and climbing.

With co-author J. Dennis Fortenberry, M.D. and professor at the IU School of Medicine, Herbenick surveyed 370 women, ages 18 to 63, all of whom had experienced some sort of exercise-induced sexual experience prior to the study. Most of the women were in a relationship or married, and about 69 percent identified themselves as heterosexual. One hundred twenty-four of them had experienced exercise-induced orgasms (EIO) and 246 had experienced exercise-induced sexual pleasure (EISP). Forty percent of the women reported that they experienced sexual pleasure from exercise 10 times or more.

Read the rest here.